Why Run With Your Dog?

Personal training for dogs. You’re kidding, right? Actually, no, we’re not. Research suggests up to 40% of our dogs are overweight, and they suffer from the same health complications that overweight people do. Veterinarians (including myself) are becoming more and more concerned about the increase in joint pain, heart disease and other obesity related illnesses in dogs. Hence, Pooch to 5k. Dogs can’t lift weights, or use the gym. If you’re going to increase their fat burning, you need to increase the intensity of their exercise. This means that a daily stroll just won’t cut it any more, it’s too laid back. The Pooch to 5k program will help you get your dog from doing nothing much to comfortably running 5km, over a period of 12 weeks.

Because you’ll be running with your dog, you’ll also get a great workout three times a week, as you train yourself to run 5km. Why not subscribe to our dog health and fitness newsletter and grab your dog, and you’re ready to go!

Author Archive

file000119318946[1]Q: I’ve been looking around for suggestions that might help me and my 4yo whippet.  She’s been with me just 6 months and is healthy and active and great on the lead.  We’ve been working up to running 5km together (I’m a slow half-marathon runner, my 5km time is 25-30 mins).  She runs beautifully for the first half of the run then lags horribly, at full stretch of the lead, behind me, most of the way back.  It doesn’t matter what the distance is – she will run 4km in one direction, but lag after 2km if we turn around.  I’ve tried running circuitous loops but I can’t fool her. I’ve also varied the time of day, our routine when we get home, the pee-breaks we stop for, whether I give her lots of verbal encouragement or not.  Nothing seems to make any difference.  She does not do the same thing on walks, or when running beside my husband on his bike.

Also, last weekend I did a 5km fun run with her and she was perfect the whole way!  I guess being around other runners motivated her?!

Any ideas gratefully received!  She has other exercise options, including short sprints in the park which obviously is the natural thing for a whippet, but I’d love to work through the running thing with her if we can. Read More→

Categories : General
Comments (5)
Jul
08

Caloundra Foreshore Fun Run

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Last month our family participated in the Caloundra Foreshore Fun Run.  Organised by the Our Lady of the Rosary school as a fund-raiser, the event incorporates a 10km and a 3km run and a non-competitive 3km walk.

While not strictly on the foreshore, for most of the race the foreshore is in sight.  Last year the kids and I with our dogs ran/walked the 10km run; this year we decided to run the 3km as the youngsters haven’t been doing as much running as before.  On a beautiful clear winter’s day we dropped Audrey and Guinness off at the start of the 10km at Golden Beach and drove across the Caloundra headland to Race HQ at Moffat Beach, the start and finish of our run and the finish of the 10km for Audrey. Read More→

Categories : General
Comments (0)

Yes, thats 74 kmI was reading another running blog recently and I stumbled upon a few pictures of a beautiful red Stumpy Tail Australian Cattle Dog, Cooba.  One of the pictures was of Cooba looking normal while a runner held a GPS unit in front of his face – distance of the run he’d just done: 74 km!

The runner in question is Clarke McClymont, and Cooba the Cattle Dog is his training partner as he prepares himself for ultramarathons like last year’s Kokoda Challenge, where the team he was in smashed the race record by around and hour and thirty minutes, over some of the toughest terrain in a trail race anywhere in Australia.

Read More→

Comments (1)

Certain things inspire my dog, and certain things don’t.  Can you guess what he likes?

Comments (0)
Apr
17

Do Dogs Get a Runner’s High?

Posted by: | Comments (3)

Endorphin Rush. Runner’s High. If you’ve ever done any intensive exercise, you’d be familiar with the feeling of relaxation and well being that follows a good workout.

I’ve often thought that my dog seems to feel just as good as I do after a run, but I’ve been unable to find any scientific proof, until now.

Researchers at the University of Arizona put dogs, humans and ferrets on a treadmill, and measured the amount of endocannabinoids that were produced after exercise. Endo – produced inside the body, cannabinoids – chemicals that activate cannabinoid receptors in the brain that cause a euphoric feeling.

Ferrets aren’t a species that evolved to run, so it’s not too surprising that they didn’t show any response to running. However, both dogs and humans showed much higher levels of endocannabinoids after a session on the treadmill. This means that our dogs do indeed get that runner’s high.

Read More→

Comments (3)
Apr
08

Easy, cheap, and cold.

Posted by: | Comments (0)

No, I’m not talking about my past life as a contract killer…

Make an ice pack to treat injuriesIf you get injured, the acronym you use to remember the treatment regime is R.I.C.E.R.  This stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation, and Refer.  They’re all pretty obvious, maybe except for refer – it means to see a doctor if it is serious, debilitating, or fails to resolve within a day or so.  Anyway, ice is sometimes inconvenient to use – it gets wet as it melts, you have to remember to fill the ice cube tray, and your children steal all of the ice cubes to make slushies when you’re not looking.  Well, not any more!  I’ve created the perfect ice pack to treat injuries.  This ice pack doesn’t make a puddle, it doesn’t have lumps of ice, and no-one is going to steal it to make cold drinks.
Read More→

Comments (0)